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Development of Aquaculture Technology for Food Security and Food Safety in the Next Generation A Team Effort between Thailand and Japan to Open Up New Horizons in Aquaculture

Principal Investigator (Affiliation)
  • SDGs2
  • SDGs14
Research Prof. OKAMOTO Nobuaki
(Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology)
researchmap
Research Institutions in Japan Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology / National Research Institute of Aquaculture, Fisheries Research Agency (FRA) / Japan International Research Center for Agricultural Sciences (JIRCAS)
Research Institutions in Thailand Department of Fisheries (DOF) / Kasetsart University (KU) / Chulalongkorn University (CU) / Walailak University (WU)
Adoption fiscal year FY 2011
Research Period 5 Years
ODA Recipient Country Kingdom of Thailand
General Description of the Research Project

Next-generation of aquaculture system promises solutions to current issues
Aquaculture has boomed in recent years worldwide, and now accounts for almost 50% of all fishery produce. However, fish farms face great many problems, including frequent disease outbreaks, securing stable supplies of feed, and maintenance of safety, and there is an urgent need for next-generation technologies that address these problems. As the leaders of Asia's aquaculture industry, Thailand and Japan have teamed up to leverage biotechnology to develop new systems for boosting production of groupers, sea bass, prawn and other commercially important varieties of seafood. In particular, molecular breeding, surrogate broodstock technology, immunization/ vaccines, development of feed alternatives, establishment of stricter seafood safety protocols will be the focus.

Focus also on creation of improved strains as a new departure in aquaculture
This project aims to leverage molecular genetic findings to develop strains that grow rapidly and are resistant to disease and stress. We will also attempt to use certain species of fish as surrogates to produce the gametes of species that have so far proven difficult to culture, as well as developing technologies for other aspects of aquaculture, including the production of alternatives to fish meal as feed, prevention of infectious diseases, and assurance of food safety.

Photo gallery
A giant grouper weighing over 100 kg being reared at Krabi Coastal Fisheries Research and Development Centre. This is the tastiest grouper species.

A giant grouper weighing over 100 kg being reared at Krabi Coastal Fisheries Research and Development Centre. This is the tastiest grouper species.

A trained technician eyes the future. Reliable breeding techniques are the strength of this SATREPS project.

A trained technician eyes the future. Reliable breeding techniques are the strength of this SATREPS project.

Research Project Web site http://www.kaiyodai.ac.jp/exchange/satreps/satreps_en/index.html
Press Release Jan. 9, 2014
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