[Precise Molecular Arrangement] Year Started : 2021

Tomoyuki Ikai

Precise control of monomer sequences and higher-order structures based on ladder formations

Researcher
Tomoyuki Ikai

Associate Professor
Graduate School of Engineering
Nagoya University

Outline

Development of a rational methodology to create synthetic polymers with desired primary, secondary, and higher-order structures in a predictable manner is still challenging, but may hold great potential for leading to dramatic innovations in material science. Based on the novel concept of defect-free ladder formations, this project aims to establish versatile strategies for constructing a variety of secondary structures (e.g., helices) and their hierarchical arrangements at various levels of dimensions. In addition, I will explore new phenomena and functions of the resulting molecular architectures possessing both secondary stcutrues and ladder/supramolecular geometries, and then develop sophisticated materials related to separation, recognition, catalysis, and information.

Fumitaka Ishiwari

Precise Arrangement of Functional Units by Multifacial Polymers

Researcher
Fumitaka Ishiwari

Associate Professor
Graduate School of Engineering
Osaka University

Outline

As a new template polymer for the precise arrangement of functional groups, we will develop a “multifacial polymer” having several different faces. The multifacial polymers are expected to form complex higher-order structures by self-assembly of the surfaces. In this research, we will construct new theories based on the multifacial polymers, realize the precise arrangement of functional groups, and explore new functions.

Suguru Ito

Creation of Advanced Organic Crystals by Precise Arrangement of Pseudo-Racemic Molecules

Researcher
Suguru Ito

Associate Professor
Graduate School of Engineering Science
Yokohama National University

Outline

In this research, I will establish a technique for arranging pseudoracemic molecules, which consist of two types of chiral organic molecules, in the same crystal by utilizing the complementarity of chiral molecules that are non-superimposable like the right and left hands. By establishing a method for arranging pseudoracemic molecules with different luminescence moieties, I will create crystalline materials that can switch luminescence properties in response to mechanical stimuli in a stepwise manner. Furthermore, I will create optoelectronic and porous materials with novel functions by precisely arranging differently functionalized molecules by this method.

Naoki Umezawa

Control of peptide structure by reversible covalent bonds to develop functional molecules

Researcher
Naoki Umezawa

Professor
Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences
Nagoya City University

Outline

Proteins exhibit sophisticated functions by arranging various functional groups in an appropriate orientation. However, peptides tend to lose their shape when taken out of proteins and thus do not show comparable activity to proteins. In this study, we prepare peptide libraries with various conformation under thermodynamic control. Reversible covalent bonds enable the interconversion of library members into one another. Using the methodology, we will develop functional peptides that inhibit protein-protein interactions and work as catalyst.

Daichi Kato

Designing low-dimensional and low-symmetry materials by controlling the arrangement of lone pair electron

Researcher
Daichi Kato

Assistant Professor
Graduate School of Engineering
Kyoto University

Outline

The purpose of this research is to design low-dimensional and low-symmetry structures by achieving rational control of the shape, direction, and arrangement of the lone pairs of cations such as Bi3+. In particular, I will focus on the interaction between lone pair cations and coordinated anions in mixed-anion systems, where more than two anions exist in one compound.

Hideyuki Kawasoko

Development of oxide phase chage memory by thermal control of local atomic arrangement

Researcher
Hideyuki Kawasoko

Assistant Professor
Graduate School of Science
Tohoku University

Outline

Currently, phase change memory attracts attention as storage class memory, and is based on reversible thermal control of crystalline and amorphous phases in chalcogenides. In this study, we realize the reversible thermal control of the ordered, disordered, and orthorhombic phases in the layered oxide by controlling the local atomic arrangement. Furthermore, we aim to realize a paradigm shift in phase change memory materials by developing multi-valued oxide phase change memory which operates at room temperature in the atmosphere.

Takashi Kitao

Development of Precisely-Designed Monolayer Materials Using Nanospaces and Interfaces

Researcher
Takashi Kitao

Assistant Professor
Graduate School of Engineering
The University of Tokyo

Outline

Functions of monolayer materials vary greatly depending on the atomic arrangement and geometric structure. In this research, by exploiting the spatial and interfacial information of metal-organic structures (MOFs), I will develop a way to fabricate graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) and two-dimensional networks with novel physical properties that have existed theoretically in the past.

Junichi Shiogai

Emergence of novel heterointerfaces in membrane superstructures

Researcher
Junichi Shiogai

Associate Professor
Graduate School of Science
Osaka University

Outline

Novel functionalities and intriguing physical properties are anticipated to emerge in heterointerfaces of various materials with well-regulated constituent elements, structure, and thickness. In this study, single crystalline membrane heterostructures are fabricated by combining epitaxial thin-film growth and chemical etching techniques. With the aim of observation of various functionalities and physical properties, we tackle the synthesis of the membrane heterostructures of materials with different crystal structure and orientation, which has been difficult in conventional epitaxial thin-film growth technique or mechanical exfoliation method. This synthesis method will open a new route toward observation of exotic physical phenomena which are absent in single crystals and conventional epitaxial thin-film superstructures.

Rie Suizu

Electronic properties of highly-correlated radical architectures based on the line graph theory

Researcher
Rie Suizu

Designated Assistant Professor
Graduate School of Science
Nagoya University

Outline

“Isocrystal topology” is the concept of further developing the electronic properties by constructing the same structures, which give its superior properties, with molecular materials. In this research, I fabricate two-dimensional architectures of highly-correlated radicals with strong in-plane intermolecular interactions, and reveal their unique band structures and molecular arrangements. By modifying the intermolecular interaction and the molecule-substrate interaction, a method to create desired lattices defined mathematically by the line graph theory is established. Furthermore, I explore electronic and electrochemical functions arising from its structural topology by controlling its Fermi level.

Takehito Seki

Development of Ultra-Low Electron Dose STEM Technique and Structural Analysis of Atomic and Molecular Arrangements in Real Space

Researcher
Takehito Seki

Assistant Professor
Graduate School of Engineering
The University of Tokyo

Outline

In this study, we develop a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) technique that enables direct observation of atomic and molecular arrangements with ultra-high resolution under ultra-low electron dose conditions, enabling us to analyze local atomic and molecular arrangements in materials that are easily damaged by electron irradiation. By directly observing the local arrangement of atoms and molecules, which plays an important role in determining material functions, and by clarifying the correlation with material functions, we aim to establish guidelines for the arrangement of functional materials.

Tomohiro Seki

Development of Luminochromic Molecular Crystals Exhibiting Deformations and Motions

Researcher
Tomohiro Seki

Senior Lecturer
Faculty of Science
Shizuoka University

Outline

In this study, stimuli-responsive molecular crystals capable of strict deformations and motions are investigated. The strict deformations and motions of molecular crystals can be achieved through single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformations in response to various external stimulations. One advantage of these molecular crystalline materials is that their molecular arrangements can be precisely determined to uncover the underlying mechanism of their stimuli responsivity. Comprehensive development of such novel molecular crystals allows the construction of the chemistry of strictly deformable/mobile materials with novel functionalities.

Hironobu Hayashi

Controlling self-assembled structures of porous nanosheets toward providing various functions

Researcher
Hironobu Hayashi

Assistant Professor
Graduate School of Materials Science
Nara Institute of Science and Technology

Outline

The development of methods to assemble various materials in a periodically constructed nanospace with molecular-level precision provides a possibility for extracting synergistic functions of structurally and physically optimized materials. In this research, we will prepare porous nanosheets which are composed of belt-shaped macrocycles. In the porous nanosheets, the precise arrangement/self-assembly of guest materials will be achieved, providing remarkable chemical and physical properties of guest materials.

Koki Makabe

Constructions of branched architectures via protein units connections

Researcher
Koki Makabe

Associate Professor
Graduate School of Science and Engineering
Yamagata University

Outline

Constructions of branched protein structures which consist of functional protein units will be constructed to create a new function. To do this, we combine serial and branched protein-protein ligation techniques to create novel dendrimer-like structures. This research project will be applied to create a new group of molecules, such as connected protein binders, enzymes, and other functional units for industrial applications.

Kazuhiro Matsumoto

Development of Sequence-Controlled Synthesis for Precise Inorganic Polymers

Researcher
Kazuhiro Matsumoto

Team Leader
Interdisciplinary Research Center for Catalytic Chemistry
National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology

Outline

In this research, we will develop a library of sequence-defined siloxane compounds, a database that systematizes the correlation between siloxane sequences and physical properties, and a method for predicting the physical properties of silicone materials using data-driven machine learning, based on our original one-pot controlled iteration method for synthesizing sequence-defined siloxane compounds.

Jumpei Morimoto

Construction of fine organic structures via arrangement of subnanometer organic blocks

Researcher
Jumpei Morimoto

Lecturer
Graduate School of Engineering
The University of Tokyo

Outline

In this study, a methodology to construct fine organic structures with subnanometer complexity will be established. The organic structures will be constructed using subnanometer-sized organic molecules as building blocks. First, several such subnanometer building blocks will be established. The crystal and solution structures of the organic structures built using the organic blocks will be studied and the guiding principles for constructing such structures will be revealed. Using the established principles, the following two applications will be pursued. First, molecules that recognize complex surface of biomolecules will be designed. Second, nano-space with fine and complex structures will be designed.

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