[Degradation and stability] Precise Material Science for Degradation and Stability

Strategic Objective

Precision control of bonding and decomposition for resource recycling

Research supervisor

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Atsushi Takahara(Research Professor, Research Center for Negative Emission Technology, Kyushu University)

Overview

 In this research area, we will develop methods to freely decompose materials by external stimuli, develop materials whose decomposition can be easily controlled, research on the functionalization of these materials by controlling their hierarchical structures, and environmentally friendly methods to control degradation and stabilization of materials. The goal of this research area is to achieve precise control of decomposition, degradation, and stabilization of materials, as well as to establish precise materials science for the development of sustainable materials with freely controllable degradability and stability, which are the ultimate contradictory physical properties of materials.
 Materials focusing on this project include polymers, organics, biomaterials, inorganics, metals, and their composites. For example, (1) method for reusing materials by transforming them into intermediate and substructures as well as atomic and molecular levels through external stimuli, a manufacturing process for materialization based on this method, and the design of sustainable materials whose decomposition products are environmentally friendly; (2) development of materials that combine decomposition functions with control methods for decomposition and degradation at multiple levels, including the molecular level and higher-order structure of materials; (3) development of visualization methods for material decomposition processes using spectroscopic methods, advanced separation methods such as chromatography, diffraction/scattering methods, microscopic methods, and computational science methods, and utilization of materials information through data accumulation; and (4) development of materials that combine the decomposition function with highly efficient self-healing of degraded areas.
 We aim to systematize “materials science of decomposition, degradation, and stabilization” as a new academic area by understanding it from the molecular level to the macro level in a multilevel manner by fusing the collaboration of various research fields and the knowledge obtained from various materials, in order to develop sustainable materials that are indispensable for the realization of a sustainable recycling society.

Research Area Advisors

Arimitsu Usuki Professor, Research Institute for Sustainable Humanosphere, Kyoto University
Kohtaro Osakada Specially Appointed Professor, Institute of Innovative Research, Tokyo Institute of Technology
Naomi Shibasaki-Kitakawa Professor, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University
Harumi Sato Professor, Graduate School of Human Development and Environment, Kobe University
Keiji Numata Professor, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University
Miki Hasegawa Professor, College of Science and Engineering, Aoyama Gakuin University
Takao Hanawa Professor, Institute of Biomaterials and Bioengineering, Tokyo Medical and Dental University
Akikazu Matsumoto Professor, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka Prefecture University
Yoshitomi Morizawa Fellow, Chemicals Company, AGC Inc.
Toshiaki Yoshioka Professor, Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Tohoku University

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