[Degradation and stability] Year Started : 2021

Norio Shibata

Development of upcycling process of fluorinated materials for circularity

Research Director
Norio Shibata

Professor
Graduate School of Engineering
Nagoya Institute of Technology

Collaborator
Hideki Amii Professor
Division of Molecular Science
Gunma University
Hisao Hori Professor
Faculty of Science
Kanagawa University
Yasunari Maekawa Director General
Quantum Beam Science Research Directorate
National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology
Outline

Development of novel methodology to cleavage C-F bonds (including CF-H and CF-CF bonds) of fluorinated materials for circularity in fluoro-chemical industries are developed. Fluoropolymers are the final target of upcycling via monomers and fluorspars based on this bond activation technology. The technology is also extended to upcycling environmentally harmful fluorocarbon products such as HFC, PFOA, and PFOS to useful fluorinated building blocks in the pharmaceutical, agrochemical, and specialty material industries. Transformation of complex fluoro-pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, and liquid crystals to novel materials are also performed. The method will realize the attractive upcycling process for the future generation.

Daisuke Suzuki

Sustainable polymeric particle-based materials with mechanical stability and selective degradability

Research Director
Daisuke Suzuki

Associate Professor
Graduate School of Textile Science & Technology
Shinshu University

Collaborator
Takayuki Uchihashi Professor
Graduate School of Science
Nagoya University
Kazuko Nakazono Associate Professor
School of Materials and Chemical Technology
Tokyo Institute of Technology
Kazushi Fujimoto Assistant Professor
Graduate School of Engineering
Nagoya University
Outline

In this project, we will develop mechanically stable, polymeric particle-based materials that can degrade them into individual particles. To achieve it, we will deepen our understanding on the stabilization and degradation of particle-based materials by the use of the state of the art measurement technology, including high-speed atomic force microscopy, and computational chemistry. Our final goal is to establish sustainable materials science and technology related to polymeric particles.

Kentaro Taki

Separating multi-material interfaces using polymer foams processed via double stimuli-induced bubble nucleation

Research Director
Kentaro Taki

Professor
College of Science and Engineering
Kanazawa University

Collaborator
Hiroshi Ito Professor
​Graduate School of Organic Materials Science
Yamagata University
Haruyuki Okamura Associate Professor
Graduate School of Engineering
Osaka Metropolitan University
Hajime Kimizuka Professor
Graduate School of Engineering
Nagoya University
Outline

In this project, a team of research groups specializing in computational materials science, polymer synthesis and processing, and chemical engineering will develop a pioneering method to separate multi-material interfaces by polymer foams processed via double stimuli-induced bubble nucleation. The technique is a new engineering solution for the multi-material recycling industry. We will develop a double stimuli-induced polymer foam and demonstrate that bubble nucleation in the polymer can delaminate multi-material interfaces. In addition, we will perform multi-scale simulations to understand interface delamination using the method.

Shigeru Deguchi

Baropolyesters: Precision degradation control by pressure

Research Director
Shigeru Deguchi


Director
Research Center for Bioscience and Nanoscience
Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology

Collaborator
Tsuyoshi Koga Professor
Graduate School of Engineering
Kyoto University
Ikuo Taniguchi Professor
Faculty of Fiber Science and Enginnering
Kyoto Institute of Technology
Outline

To realize chemical recycling in which a polymer is depolymerized into a monomer and then re-polymerized to the polymer, a new mechanism that reconciles the ultimate conflicting functions of “stability” and “degradability” is required. In this research, we will establish the scientific principle on degradation control using pressure-induced nano-structural changes of polymers through collaborative research of experiments, analysis , and theory. We will use the achievements to develop sustainable polymer materials whose stability and degradability can be freely controlled by pressure.

Kotohiro Nomura

Development of Bio-Based Advanced Polymers and their Depolymerization, Chemical Recycle

Research Director
Kotohiro Nomura

Professor
Graduate School of Science
Tokyo Metropolitan University

Collaborator
Hiroshi Hirano Senior Executive Research Scientist
Morinomiya Center
Osaka Research Institute of Industrial Science and Technology
Masafumi Hirano Professor
Graduate School of Engineering
Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology
Outline

The project concerns the development of bio-based advanced polymers derived from natural abundant non-edible plant resources, and of the efficient catalysts for selective bond cleavage, functionalization of polymer chains for depolymerization or conversion to fine chemicals (chemical recycling). The core technology is our original precise polymerization (olefin metathesis through efficient carbon-carbon bond formation) and the quantitative end functionalization techniques that provide unique materials by integration of functionality. The project also aims synthesis of the network polymers by cross-linking, or reversible bond formation and cleavage (controlled by stimuli etc.) by the end-functionalized polymers. The efforts should provide a new bio-based materials that should contribute to establish green sustainable society, circular economy (design, production, consumption, and recycling).

Masaya Yamamoto

Integrated understanding of degraded nanomaterials coexisting in environmental and biological cycles

Research Director
Masaya Yamamoto

Professor
Graduate School of Engineering
Tohoku University

Collaborator
Tsuyoshi Kimura Associate Professor
Institute of Biomaterials and Bioengineering
Tokyo Medical and Dental University
Tadao Tanabe Professor
Department of Engineering and Design
Shibaura Institute of Technology
Outline

In this study, a team of experts in medical polymers, tissue engineering, and laser engineering will advance an integrated understanding of decomposed and degraded nanomaterials. To do so, we will first use model nanomaterials that have been decomposed and degraded in the laboratory to understand the material properties of nanoplastics that may result from the decomposition and degradation of plastics in the environment or from the degradation of bioabsorbable medical materials in the body. Based on this, we will use cultured cells to study the biological effects of nanoplastics in relation to their material properties.

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