[Extracellular Fine Particles] Year Started : 2019

Sadao Ota

High-dimensional networked measurement for studying heterogeneity and dynamics of extracellular vesicles

Research Director
Sadao Ota

Associate Professor
Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology
The University of Tokyo

Collaborator
Ryosuke Kojima Assistant Professor
Graduate School of Medicine
The University of Tokyo
Koji Hase Professor
School of Pharmaceutical Sciences
Keio University
Yusuke Yoshioka Assistant Professor
Institute of Medical Science
Tokyo Medical University
Outline

In this research, we develop high-dimensional networked measurement technologies for studying heterogeneity and dynamics of extracellular vesicles (EVs). High-dimensional cytometry will enable isolation of EVs for developing new EV classification methods, and networked measurement will clarify roles and dynamics of heterogeneous EVs at the single cell level.

Toshihiko Ogura

Development of a novel liquid-sample nano-scope and the comprehensive research on the extracellular nano-particles

Research Director
Toshihiko Ogura

Chief Senior Researcher
Health and Medical Research Institute
National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST)

Collaborator
Kazuhide Sato Designated Lecturer
Garaduate School of Medicine
Nagoya University
Shinya Murakami Professor and Chair
Graduate School of Dentistry
Osaka University
Outline

To examine the influence of the extracellular nano-particles on living cells, it is required to observe the cells and the nano-particles directly in aqueous condition. In this study, we will develop a novel liquid-sample electron nano-scope that can directly observe the biological samples without staining and fixation. Moreover, we will analyze the influence of environmental nano-particles and antibody-particles on cells using this newly developed nano-scope.

Hirohisa Takano

Elucidation of the dynamics/kinetics of environmental particles and the underlying mechanisms by which they cause biological and immune responses, and identification of the exogenous/endogenous factors and molecules contributing to their health effects.

Research Director
Hirohisa Takano

Professor
Graduate School of Global Environmental Studies
Kyoto University

Collaborator
Kenichiro Inoue Professor
School of Nursing
University Of Shizuoka
Tomoaki Okuda Professor
Faculty of Science and Technology
Keio University
Etsushi Kuroda Professor and Chairman
Department of Immunology
Hyogo College Of Medicine
Yoshikazu Mikami Associate Professor
Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences
Niigata University
Outline

We will indicate that various environmental particles which exacerbate respiratory and allergic diseases have different entry routes into the body and underlying mechanisms of biological and immune responses. These differences can be used for the medical and biological (endogenous) categorization of the environmental particles. Next, we will elucidate the mechanisms by which diverse particulate matter with aerodynamic dias. ≤ 2.5 µm (PM2.5) induces biological and immune responses based on this endogenous categorization. Especially, we will identify the factors and molecules contributing to the health effects of PM2.5 via exogenous (environmental analysis) and endogenous (medicine and biology) approaches, and clear the connections between exogenous and endogenous factors based on the molecules and their changes.

Shinya Toyokuni

Effects of biological response to extracellular fine particles on carcinogenesis and atherosclerosis

Research Director
Shinya Toyokuni

Professor
Graduate School of Medicine
Nagoya University

Collaborator
Haruka Omachi Lecturer
School of Science
Nagoya University
Masafumi Nakayama Professor
College of Pharmacy
Ritsumeikan University
Toyoaki Murohara Professor
Graduate School of Medicine
Nagoya University
Outline

We are exposed to various extracellular fine particles in our daily life, as consumer products or as environmental pollutants. Here we will analyze the effects of extracellular fine particles, from the viewpoint of biological response, on two major causes of human mortality, cancer and atherosclerosis. We will use nanomaterials which would be used for wearable devices, and also enviomental fine particles for the evaluation. We seek to discover general principles in these biological effects, especially focusing on iron metabolism and ferroptosis. We would publish these results to contribute to safer working environment and civic life. Simultaneously, we undertake to discover novel drug delivery systems, based on our findings.

Rikiya Watanabe

Single particle technologies of extracellular vesicles for life and medical sciences.

Research Director
Rikiya Watanabe

Chief Scientist
Cluster for Pioneering Research
RIKEN

Collaborator
Motoyuki Otsuka Assistant Professor
Faculty of Medicine University Hospital
The University of Tokyo
Ai Koutani Professor
School of Medicine
Tokai University
Toru Komatsu Assistant Professor
Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences
The University of Tokyo
Hiroshi Nishimasu Professor
Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology
The University of Tokyo
Outline

Our study aims to elucidate the mechanism by which individual extracellular vesicles function in a precise manner, by developing novel single-particle technologies using multidisciplinary approaches, including bioMEMS, biophysics, chemical biology, and medicine. In addition, we are developing a methodology to investigate correlations between genetic mutations, dysfunctions, and diseases with single-particle sensitivity, which would provide new insights for biological as well as medical and pharmaceutical studies.

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