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Development and Dissemination of Sustainable Production System Based on Invasive Pest Management of Cassava in Vietnam, Cambodia and Thailand Protect South-East Asian cassava from invasive pests to grow healthy seedlings!

Principal Investigator (Affiliation)
  • SDGs2
Prof.
TAKASU Keiji
(Faculty of Agriculture, Kyushu University)
Research Institutions in Japan Kyushu University / Tokyo University of Agriculture / The University of Tokyo / RIKEN / Nagoya University
Research Institutions in
Vietnam and Cambodia and Thailand
Vietnam: Agricultural Genetics Institute, etc.
Cambodia: University of Battambang
Thailand: Rayong Field Crops Research Center
Adoption fiscal year FY 2015
Research Period 5 Years
ODA Recipient Country Socialist Republic of VietnamVietnam / Kingdom of CambodiaCambodia
/ Kingdom of ThailandThailand
General Description of the Research Project

Develop and disseminate pest management technologies and systems for producing healthy seedlings
In recent years, climate change and the rapid acceleration of global trade have led to increasing crop damage from invasive pests worldwide, with South East Asian cassava crops no exception. We aim to develop pest management technologies for use in Vietnam, Cambodia, and Thailand, including crop disease diagnosis kits and biological control for insect pests, as well as systems for ensuring the production and cultivation of healthy seedlings. Furthermore, we will work to construct a sustainable production system that utilizes healthy seedlings by developing a market-based “triple-win” dissemination model that benefits the private sector, farmers, and government.

Stabilization and increase of cassava production will vitalize the regional economy in South East Asia.
This project will serve as a model case for practical cooperation between related countries to address cross-jurisdictional issues. Increased revenue from cassava will benefit partner countries by raising the income of small-scale farmers, boosting employment at processing plants in the region, serving as a source of foreign currency, providing biomass for use, and offering policy hints, while also delivering major benefits for Japanese companies engaged in cassava-related business, both in Japan and partner countries.

Photo gallery
The cassava mealybug, which has become an invasive pest in South East Asia

The cassava mealybug, which has become an invasive pest in South East Asia

Cassava stems and potatoes whose leaves dropped prior to harvest

Cassava stems and potatoes whose leaves dropped prior to harvest

Harvesting cassava

Harvesting cassava

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