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Hikaru Kobayashi

Hikaru Kobayashi
Osaka University
Professor

Achievement of ultra-low reflectivity by interface control method and ultra-high conversion efficiency of crystalline Si solar cells

Hikaru Kobayashi_Fig Ultra-low reflectivity of Si surfaces, resulting from the formation of a nanocrystalline Si layer, can be achieved simply by contact of platinum catalysts with Si wafers immersed in H2O2+HF solutions. Using this method in fabrication of crystalline Si solar cells, high photocurrent density can be obtained. Due to low defect densities in the Si nanocrystalline layer, high photovoltage can be realized with the surface passivation method. Consequently, this interface control method can achieve ultra-high conversion efficiency under low costs.

SANG Liwen

SANG Liwen
National Institute for Materials Science
Independent Researcher

Multi-band engineering of III-Nitride for high efficiency photoelectricity energy conversion devices

SANG Liwen_Fig The direct-bandgap III-Nitrde semiconductors span the widest spectral range from infrared to the deep ultraviolet region, which provides their unique applications in the high-efficiency photoelectricity energy conversion devices. The purpose of this research is to solve the puzzle of p-type doping in In-rich InGaN film by intelligently desigining the growth technique, and develop high-efficiency full-spectrum photoelectricity energy conversion devices, such as long-wavelength light emitting diodes and ultra-high efficiency photovoltaic cells.

Atsushi Kobayashi

Atsushi Kobayashi
Hokkaido University
Associate Professor

Development of a self-assembled super-nanocrystal photocatalyst

Atsushi Kobayashi_Fig The aim of this research is to establish the self-assembling technique to create a novel nanoporous nanocrystal-based photocatalytic system built from molecular photosensitizers and redox catalysts. In order to produce the energy gradient to transfer protons and electrons from oxidation center to reduction center, several functional molecules are precisely integrated into the inside or surface of the nanoporous nanocrystals by utilizing various intermolecular (interatomic) interactions as covalent bond, hydrogen bond, coordination bond, hydrophilic-hydrophobic interactions and so on.

Takashi Okubo

Takashi Okubo
Kinki University
Associate Professor

Development of Hybrid-Interfaces Based on Ferroelectric Coordination Polymers, and its Application to Photovoltaic Devices

Takashi Okubo_Fig Ferroelectric coordination polymers are new organic-inorganic hybrid-materials consisting of metal ions and organic bridging ligands. We found that the ferroelectric coordination polymers showed unique carrier transport properties, that is, the high charge carrier mobilities comparable to that of amorphous silicon and the generation of the long-lived carriers by the light irradiation. I will develop new hybrid-interfaces based on the ferroelectric coordination polymers, and apply them to highly-efficient photovoltaic devices in this project.

Ken-ichi Uchida

Ken-ichi Uchida
Tohoku University
Assistant Professor

Creation of Innovative Energy Device Technology Based on Spin Currents

Ken-ichi Uchida_Fig This project aims to develop innovative power generating and saving technologies that enable the recovery and utilization of omnipresent environmental energy via "spin currents", flows of spin-angular momentum. In this study, by using a novel energy-conversion principle based on "effective-spin-temperature engineering" at magnet/metal phase interfaces, we focus the investigation on spin-current generation by light absorption, and establish basic technologies to make effective use of unharnessed energy in various materials including insulators.

Shuzi Hayase

Shuzi Hayase
Kyushu Institute of Technology
Professor

Simultaneous preparation of bulk-heterojunction interface from soluble inorgenic precursors and application to hybrid solar cells

Shuzi Hayase_Fig This project is on fabrication of low cost and high efficiency solar cells. Conventional bulk-heterojunction solar cells with organic and inorganic hybrid structures have potential as high efficiency solar cells. However, some weak points such as long preparation processes and less charge collection abilities have been reported. Our study is aiming at solving these points. The bulk-heterojunction interface with the hybrid structure is prepared all at once from soluble inorganic precursors. We propose new materials, processes, and device structures to realize the structure. Researchers in the fields of molecular design, syntheses, time resolved spectroscopy, cell structure, and processes join this project to design high performance photoconversion interfaces.

Koichi Yamashita

Koichi Yamashita
The University of Tokyo
Professor

Theoretical design of photoinduced phase-interface elementary processes based on computational energy conversion science

Koichi Yamashita_Fig The technology which holds the key to expanding the use of solar energy is viewed from the perspective of "phase-interface photoinduced elementary processes” and we study the control and optimization of the elementary processes required by each technology based on theoretical and computational chemistry. Organic solar cells and photocatalytic reactions are taken up as energy conversion technology. Phase-interfaces are built by basic materials, such as organic polymers, transition metal oxides, III-V compound semiconductors, carbon nanotubes, and graphenes etc., and we promote the computational energy conversion science for controlling and optimizing complex factors, such as phase-interface structure, impurities doping, and structural defects.

Takuma Yasuda

Takuma Yasuda
Kyushu Univeristy
Professor

Development of Organic Electronic Devices Utilizing Mesoscopic Superstructures of Liquid-Crystalline Semiconductors

Takuma Yasuda_Fig Liquid-crystalline semiconductors are a new class of electrofunctional soft materials, which involve self-repairing capability and flexibility, in contrast to conventional crystalline or amorphous semiconductors. In this research project, supramolecular self-organization and orientation of the liquid-crystalline semiconductors ranging from nano to micro will be clarified. In addition, highly functional, sophisticated soft matter electronic devices will be fabricated by controlling their superstructures and interfaces.

Yoshitaka Tateyama

Yoshitaka Tateyama
National Institute for Materials Science
Group Leader

First-principles statistical mechanics on charge transfer and excitation processes at interfaces of solar cells and photocatalysts in operation

Yoshitaka Tateyama_Fig Establishment of computational techniques combining first-principles electronic states calculation and statistical sampling for interfacial processes is addressed. Using these techniques, I elucidate atomic and electronic mechanisms of charge transfer and excitation processes at interfaces of operating solar cells and photocatalysts (mainly TiO2/liquid interfaces) in thermal equilibrium. Those results enable theoretical design of systems with more efficient energy conversion and formulation of interfacial photoelectrochemistry on the atomic and electronic scales.

Katsuyoshi Ikeda

Katsuyoshi Ikeda
Nagoya Institute of Technology University
Professor

Dressed photon-assisted photochemistry at well-defined interfaces

Katsuyoshi Ikeda_Fig This project aims to develop a highly efficient photo-energy conversion system in a molecular-modified electrode. Enhancement of photon-molecule interactions is achieved by conversion of propagating massless photons to localized heavy photons at the interface. Charge separation efficiency is increased by using three-dimensionally integrated photo-functional molecular thin layers. Simultaneous utilization of these two concepts is realized only at atomically defined electrode surfaces.

Gen Inoue

Gen Inoue
Kyoto University
Assistant Professor

High Efficiency Phase Interface for Electron and Mass Transfer by Structure Design of Carbon and Binder

Gen Inoue_Fig Improvement of mass and electron conductivity is essential for a high-performance battery. However, the nano-structure and contacting interfaces of conductive additive and binder are not understood enough at present. In this study, mass and electron transfer are measured and simulated by considering actual aggregation and contact phase resistance. The correlation between coating and drying processes of electrode layer and maldistribution of a cell component is understood and modeled. By the knowledge above, control technology of phase interface for electron and mass transfer is developed. I aim at new technical innovation for various batteries.

Masaki Matsui

Masaki Matsui
Mie University
Research Associate Professor

Study of electrode/electrolyte interphase for rechargeable magnesium batteries

Masaki Matsui_Fig Rechargeable magnesium battery is expected as a low cost and high-energy battery system. The biggest challenge of this system is the low cell voltage due to the electrochemical window of the electrolyte solutions. In this project, we are going to design an artificial interphase layer between magnesium metal/high voltage electrolyte solutions to obtain a high energy rechargeable magnesium battery system.

Takuya Masuda

Takuya Masuda
National Institute for Materials Science
Senior Researcher

Investigation of the oxygen reduction reaction mechanism by in situ solid/liquid interface XPS

Takuya Masuda_Fig A novel X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) system which enables to perform a measurement at solid/liquid interface under electrochemical condition is developed and utilized to investigate the oxygen reduction reaction mechanism at cathode electrodes for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells and Li-air batteries. Based on understanding of the reaction mechanism, sophisticated cathode electrodes with high electrocatalytic activity are designed.

Satoshi Nihonyanagi

Satoshi Nihonyanagi
RIKEN
ASI Research Scientist

Development of an extreme nonlinear spectromicroscope for buried material interfaces

Satoshi Nihonyanagi_Fig This project is dedicated to developing a novel nonlinear spectromicroscope, which would enable us to observe buried interfaces of real devices. Molecular structures and the spatial distributions of various material interfaces such as lithium ion battery will be revealed by applying this new method. Such molecular level elucidations of the material interfaces would promote designing or developing new devices/materials.

Masanobu Nakayama

Masanobu Nakayama
Nagoya Institute of Technology
Associate Professor

Lithium dynamics at two phase boundary in electrode materials for lithium ion battery

Masanobu Nakayama_Fig Research on fast lithium dynamics in condensed materials is of importance to develop lithium ion battery with high power and efficiency. The goal of this study is the fundamental understanding of Li transportation mechanism at the phase boundary in electrode material by combined computational experimental approaches. We expect the results will contribute to a development of high power battery for electric vehicles and an all solid-state battery composed of ceramics.

Shohji Tsushima

Shohji Tsushima
Osaka University
Professor

High Efficient Flow Battery with Intensive Utilization of Electrode-Electrolyte Interface

Shohji Tsushima_Fig Flow battery can lead to a stable supply and efficient use of the electric power of our country by load leveling and large-scale electric power storage of renewable energy. This project aims at the creation of an efficient flow battery which achieves the outstanding charge-and-discharge efficiency and a high output by integrating micro fluidic and battery technologies for the intensive use of an electrode-electrolyte interface.

Takeshi Abe

Takeshi Abe
Kyoto University
Professor

Studies on ion transport in porous electrode for high rate performance batteries

For fast charge-discharge reactions in the rechargeable batteris, rapid transport of ions and electrons in the electrode is essential. In this study, we will conduct fundamental studies on the ion transport properties in the porous electrodes consisting of active material, conductive additive, and polymer binder. Based on this result, we will show the guideline of the porous electode with fast ion transport for the high rate performance batteries.

Kohei Miyazaki

Kohei Miyazaki
Kyoto University
Assistant Professor

Triple-Phase Boundaries of Bifunctional Cathodes for Metal-Air Secondary Batteries

Kohei Miyazaki_Fig This research focuses on interfacial phenomena of the bifunctional cathodes for metal-air secondary batteries, which are promising candidates for a next-generation electric power source with large capacities and safety. Through this study, I will establish a design guide for the triple-phase boundaries of bifunctional cathodes with high efficiency and long lifetime with the aim to construct a world's most cutting-edge energy technology.

Yoshitaka Tateyama

Yoshitaka Tateyama
National Institute for Materials Science
Group Leader

First-principles statistical mechanics on charge transfer and excitation processes at interfaces of solar cells and photocatalysts in operation

Yoshitaka Tateyama_Fig Establishment of computational techniques combining first-principles electronic states calculation and statistical sampling for interfacial processes is addressed. Using these techniques, I elucidate atomic and electronic mechanisms of charge transfer and excitation processes at interfaces of operating solar cells and photocatalysts (mainly TiO2/liquid interfaces) in thermal equilibrium. Those results enable theoretical design of systems with more efficient energy conversion and formulation of interfacial photoelectrochemistry on the atomic and electronic scales.

CHEN Mingwei

CHEN Mingwei
Tohoku University
Professor

"Interface science inspired nanoporous composites for next-generation energy devices"

CHEN Mingwei_Fig In this study we will develop innovative nanoporous metals and composites for next-generation energy storage/conversion devices that possess both high power density and high energy density, superior to current energy devices, for a wide range of practical applications. The advanced functions of these devices will be achieved by optimizing and manipulating the surfaces and interfaces inside the porous nano architecture on the basis of experimental and theoretical investigations of the unique surface/interface phenomena in the nanoporous materials. By utilizing high-resolution electron microscopy, in-situ Raman spectroscopy and ab-initio simulation, we will pursuit new discoveries in surface/interface science for the improved performances of the energy devices.

Kunio Takayanagi

Kunio Takayanagi
Tokyo Institute of Technology
Professor

Nanocycle at Nano-in-Macro Interface

Kunio Takayanagi_Fig Contacts of nano and macro structures, "nano-in-macro", can form specific phases which should govern cyclic transport of ions and electrons moving into and out from the contact phase, "nanocycle". The nanocycle at nano-in-macro is the key issue to be unveiled in order to make devices of a higher efficiency, i.e., lithium ion batteries and catalysts. Nano-in-macro structures and nanocycles are studied by the 50pm electron microscopy of the world best resolution.

Jun Kano

Jun Kano
Okayama University
Associate Professor

Designed catalysis assisted by metal-ferroelectric interfaces

Jun Kano_Fig Development of designed novel catalysis assisted by ferroelectric polarization fluctuation is proposed. Charge fluctuation of ferroelectric materials appeared in the paraelectric phase can assist electron injection into the chemical reaction, realizing the catalytic function. The project aims to provide the method of designed ubiquitous catalyst using nanometal-ferroelectric junctions.

Keisuke Nagato

Keisuke Nagato
The University of Tokyo
Lecturer

Design and fabrication of meso-scaled electrode microstructures for optimal transfer of matters and reaction at boundaries.

Keisuke Nagato_Fig Ions, electrons, and gases are transferred in complicated three-dimensional microstructures in electrodes of fuel cells and chemically reacted each other at the boundarirs among the paths. The important factor for the theoretically-highest generation performance is reducing the complicated transferring paths. In this project, I develop the controlled-fabrication method of the optimal microstructure with the view point of meso-scaled design of microstructures.

Takuto Araki

Takuto Araki
Yokohama National University
Associate Professor

Study about coupled phenomena of heat and mass transfer with electrochemical reactions and its application for optimal phase boundary designing

Takuto Araki_Fig Polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) is one of the cleanest and most fuel saving energy conversion devices. For the optimal design of PEFC reaction layer, the understanding of coupled phenomena consists of heat and mass transport and electrochemical reaction is essential. For the understanding , the thin film micro sensor array will be developed and the temperature and water concentration distribution near reaction layer will be measured. Moreover, the malti-scale numerical simulation will be developed and conducted to realize the conjugated problem inside reaction layer of PEFC.

Tetsuroh Shirasawa

Tetsuroh Shirasawa
University of Tokyo
Assistant Professor

Development of a multi-wavelength dispersive surface X-ray diffractometory and its application to time-resolved observation of phase interfaces

Tetsuroh Shirasawa_Fig How does the structure at phase interfaces changes during reactions? I will answer the fundamental question by developing a high-speed surface X-ray diffractometory whick can measure the dynamical structural changes at interfaces on milti-length scale (angstrom to nanometers). By using the new technique, I will elucidate the key phenomena for highly-effieicent energy utilization and feedback the information to designing a new high-performance phase interface.

Sakae Takenaka

Sakae Takenaka
Kyushu Univeristy
Associate Professor

Development of highly active and durable electrocatalysts by coverage with metal oxide layers

Sakae Takenaka_Fig Highly active and durable cathode catalysts have been required for the commercialization of polymer electrolyte fuel cells. We have demonstrated that the coverage of Pt cathode catalysts with silica layers improved the durability of Pt catalysts. In the present study, we would examine the diffusion of reactants and products in silica layers of the silica-coated Pt catalysts and the structure of the interface between silica layers and Pt metal particles in the catalysts. We would propose the catalysis of highly active and durable silica-coated Pt catalysts on the basis of the results obtained in the present study.

Kenji Miyatake

Kenji Miyatake
University of Yamanashi
Professor

Development of triple-phase-boundary using innovative anion conductive polymers and its applications to alkaline fuel cells

Kenji Miyatake_Fig For high performance and durable alkaline fuel cells, the following research subjects are conducted: 1) stable anion conductive polymers, 2) high performance non-precious metal electrocatalysts, and 3) triple-phase-boundary with controlled reaction field. Conjugated anion conductive polymers and non-precious metal electrocatalysts (prepared by nanocapsule method) are combined to form electrocatalyst layers, of which structure is optimized to achieve efficient fuel oxidation and oxygen reduction reactions. The optimized electrocatalyst layers and the anion conductive membranes are used for improving the performance and durability of alkaline fuel cells.

Satoshi Yasuda

Satoshi Yasuda
Hokkaido University
Associate Professor

Programmable Synthesis of Highly Catalytic Active Site using Molecular Self-assemby

Satoshi Yasuda_Fig This research project aims to develop novel synthesis technique of noble metal-free fuel cell cathode catalysts with efficient oxygen reduction reaction performance. Using self-assembly of feedstock molecules, we will fabricate atomically-precise catalyst, such that the oxygen reduction reaction taking place along the catalyst – electrolyte interface is optimized. This technique would provide us with activity control of the catalytic interface thus achieving a highly effective cathode catalyst.

Keiji Yashiro

Keiji Yashiro
Tohoku University
Associate Professor

Innovative design of electrochemical functional interface for efficient energy conversion systems

Keiji Yashiro_Fig Ion-conducting oxides have attracted attention as materials for environmental and energy related applications. Improving their performance enables to reduce system cost and achieve high energy conversion efficiency of fuel cells, hydrogen separation membrane etc. In this study, we aim to establish the novel material design concept to enhance the ionic conductivity greatly by engineering the material interface.

Tatsuya Kawada

Tatsuya Kawada
Tohoku Univerfsity
Professor

Interface-region engineering of high-temperature electrodes based on in-situ measurements under real operation conditions.

Tatsuya Kawada_Fig Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) is a flexible and expedient energy conversion system for achieving stable energy supply with low carbon emission. A key technology towards commercialization is the optimization of the electordes, which, however, is not an easy task because of the complicated processes taking place around the interfaces. The goal of this study is to develop measurement and analysis methods for understanding nano-, micro-, and macro-scale behaviors of the interface region under real operation conditions, and to establish an engineering approach to design the optimum interface for high temperature electrodes.

Michihisa Koyama

Michihisa Koyama
Kyushu University
Professor

Multi-Scale and Multi-Physics Approach for Designing Materials and Microstructure of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Electrodes

Michihisa Koyama_Fig Reduction of irreversible losses associated with reaction and mass transport is important for higher efficiency of the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). This project aims at improving SOFC efficiency by designing better materials and microstructure of electrodes. Toward this goal, intensive collaborations of experimental and simulation approaches will be performed. Drastic performance improvement of SOFC electrodes is challenged from both materials and microstructural aspects by integrating chemistry, mechanical engineering, materials engineering, etc.

Tomoya Ono

Tomoya Ono
University of Tsukuba
Associate Professor

Computational design of interface structures for high-performance and low-energy-loss electronic devices

Tomoya Ono_Fig To realize high-performance and low-energy-loss electronic devices, interface atomic structures and fabrication procedures are developed using first-principles calculations. By investigating the origin of leakage current and low channel mobility at interfaces, I propose prescriptions to improve device performance and demonstrate the applicability of the interface structures and fabrication procedures. Furthermore, I establish a basic technology of computational science to design interface structures and fabrication procedures of future electronic devices.

Katsuhiro Tomioka

Katsuhiro Tomioka
Hokkaido University
Assistant Professor

Development of novel hydrogen-generating devices and low-power switch using new semiconductor heterointerfaces

Katsuhiro Tomioka_Fig This project aim to develop several devices with low-power consumption and higher energy-efficiency by using new physics appeared at new Si/III-V heterojunctions. As for higher energy- efficiency devices, a wire-less solar hydrogen-generating cell will be demonstrated. For low-power devices, steep-slope transistors using Si/III-V junctions will be fabricated.

Takashi Okubo

Takashi Okubo
Kinki University
Associate Professor

Development of Hybrid-Interfaces Based on Ferroelectric Coordination Polymers, and its Application to Photovoltaic Devices

Takashi Okubo_Fig Ferroelectric coordination polymers are new organic-inorganic hybrid-materials consisting of metal ions and organic bridging ligands. We found that the ferroelectric coordination polymers showed unique carrier transport properties, that is, the high charge carrier mobilities comparable to that of amorphous silicon and the generation of the long-lived carriers by the light irradiation. I will develop new hybrid-interfaces based on the ferroelectric coordination polymers, and apply them to highly-efficient photovoltaic devices in this project.

Takuma Yasuda

Takuma Yasuda
Kyushu Univeristy
Professor

Development of Organic Electronic Devices Utilizing Mesoscopic Superstructures of Liquid-Crystalline Semiconductors

Takuma Yasuda_Fig Liquid-crystalline semiconductors are a new class of electrofunctional soft materials, which involve self-repairing capability and flexibility, in contrast to conventional crystalline or amorphous semiconductors. In this research project, supramolecular self-organization and orientation of the liquid-crystalline semiconductors ranging from nano to micro will be clarified. In addition, highly functional, sophisticated soft matter electronic devices will be fabricated by controlling their superstructures and interfaces.

Koji Kita

Koji Kita
The University of Tokyo
Associate Professor

Interface Engineering for High Performance SiC MOSFETs with Low On-state Resistance

Koji Kita_Fig The reduction of on-state resistance is inevitable to achieve high performance SiC-MOSFETs for power device applications. In this study the device performance improvement will be demonstrated by developing new process technologies based on precise control of hetero-solid-interface reactions. The process to form a high-quality ultrathin oxide layer on SiC, by suppressing the defect formation due to imperfect oxidation of SiC, will be developed for the enhancement of carrier mobility. In addition the process to reduce the SiC-metal contact resistance, by tuning the energy barrier at the interface, will be also investigated.

Ken-ichi Uchida

Ken-ichi Uchida
Tohoku University
Assistant Professor

Creation of Innovative Energy Device Technology Based on Spin Currents

Ken-ichi Uchida_Fig This project aims to develop innovative power generating and saving technologies that enable the recovery and utilization of omnipresent environmental energy via "spin currents", flows of spin-angular momentum. In this study, by using a novel energy-conversion principle based on "effective-spin-temperature engineering" at magnet/metal phase interfaces, we focus the investigation on spin-current generation by light absorption, and establish basic technologies to make effective use of unharnessed energy in various materials including insulators.

Koji Sekiguchi

Koji Sekiguchi
Keio University
Assistant Professor

Development of Ultra-low Power Consumption Magnon-device

Koji Sekiguchi_Fig In order to implement highly efficient energy utilization, new spin functions will be developed and demonstrated in this project. The proposed spin-function will utilize the propagating magnon at ferromagnetic/nonmagnetic metal interfaces. This interface magnon enables us to control the spin signal electrically and can be used as fundamental operation principles for future ultra-low power consumption nano-devices.

Hosei Nagano

Hosei Nagano
Nagoya University
Associate Professor

Innovation in heat transport technology based on thermal-hydraulics analysis of tri-phase interface in micro porous structure

Hosei Nagano_Fig In order to realize highly-efficient heat energy utilization, advanced heat transport technology is required. In this study, exploration and its modeling of thermal-hydraulics phenomena in tri-phase interface in micro porous structure are conducted in order to enhance the performance of capillary-driven two-phase heat transport device, which is promising long-distance heat transport technology. Finally, by proposition of optimal phase interface in porous structure, and integrative analysis and design of phase interface phenomena at multi-scales, innovative heat energy transport device is developed.

Tadaaki Nagao

Tadaaki Nagao
National Institue for Materials Science
Group Leader

Interface Electromagnetic Field Controlling and Thermal Energy Utilization by Ceramics Heterolayers

Tadaaki Nagao_Fig In this project, we will establish the guiding principles and the strategy for developing materials for realizing high-efficiency heat absorption, heat emitting devices and other types of energy converters based on low-dimensional electromagnetic response at the heterointerfaces of ceramics and glass films. The materials developments will be thrust from the stand point of element strategy and combined with the nano fabrication techniques as well as electromagnetic controlling techniques for establishing new materials engineering to contribute for low-carbon society.

Tsuyoshi Totani

Tsuyoshi Totani
Hokkaido University
Associate Professor

Wavelength Control of Radiation using Micro Structure with Metal Film

Tsuyoshi Totani_Fig The objective of this study is to spectacularly improve the efficiency of a heat pump by means of not only the convection heat transfer but also drastically enhanced radiation in the heat transfer from the condenser of a heat pump to an ambient environment. The micro structures with a metal film is adopted as the heating surface of the condenser. The mechanism of the wavelength selection in the absorption and the emission of an electromagnetic wave on the micro structures is clarified. The radiation is controlled in the region of the wavelength that the atmosphere absorbs and emits a little radiation. This study develops the condenser with the wavelength selection which is easily produced at a low cost and in a large volume.

Junichiro Shiomi

Junichiro Shiomi
The University of Tokyo
Associate Professor

Development of environmentally friendly thermoelectric semiconductor using nanostructure interfaces

Junichiro Shiomi_Fig Although thermoelectric conversion is a promising technology for waste heat recovery with the ability to directly convert heat to electricity, the low conversion efficiency needs to be improved for many practical applications. In this project, to improve the conversion efficiency, we aim to control phonon and electron transport by using the interfaces of nanostructured bulk thermoelectric material, which consists of randomly distributed nanoscale crystal structures. For this, we develop an analysis tool that relates atomic scale physics to the overall material performance, and carry out material design based on fundamental principles.

Yasuyuki Takata

Yasuyuki Takata
Kyushu University
Professor

Interfacial Meta-Fluidics

Yasuyuki Takata_Fig Heat and mass transfer at solid-gas-liquid interface, such as evaporation, condensation and adsorption, strongly influences the performance of various energy systems. The present study proposes a new scientific discipline "Meta-Fluidics" pursuing transcendence of conventional performance of the systems by making use of nanostructures of interface. Optimum design of complex nanosturucture with the aid of knowledge from the meta-fluidics will be capable of creating innovative high-efficiency heat/mass transfer surfaces, which goes beyond the conventional macroscale measure of interface characteristics.

Tetsuroh Shirasawa

Tetsuroh Shirasawa
University of Tokyo
Assistant Professor

Development of a multi-wavelength dispersive surface X-ray diffractometory and its application to time-resolved observation of phase interfaces

Tetsuroh Shirasawa_Fig How does the structure at phase interfaces changes during reactions? I will answer the fundamental question by developing a high-speed surface X-ray diffractometory whick can measure the dynamical structural changes at interfaces on milti-length scale (angstrom to nanometers). By using the new technique, I will elucidate the key phenomena for highly-effieicent energy utilization and feedback the information to designing a new high-performance phase interface.

Gen Inoue

Gen Inoue
Kyoto University
Assistant Professor

High Efficiency Phase Interface for Electron and Mass Transfer by Structure Design of Carbon and Binder

Gen Inoue_Fig Improvement of mass and electron conductivity is essential for a high-performance battery. However, the nano-structure and contacting interfaces of conductive additive and binder are not understood enough at present. In this study, mass and electron transfer are measured and simulated by considering actual aggregation and contact phase resistance. The correlation between coating and drying processes of electrode layer and maldistribution of a cell component is understood and modeled. By the knowledge above, control technology of phase interface for electron and mass transfer is developed. I aim at new technical innovation for various batteries.

Takuto Araki

Takuto Araki
Yokohama National University
Associate Professor

Study about coupled phenomena of heat and mass transfer with electrochemical reactions and its application for optimal phase boundary designing

Takuto Araki_Fig Polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) is one of the cleanest and most fuel saving energy conversion devices. For the optimal design of PEFC reaction layer, the understanding of coupled phenomena consists of heat and mass transport and electrochemical reaction is essential. For the understanding , the thin film micro sensor array will be developed and the temperature and water concentration distribution near reaction layer will be measured. Moreover, the malti-scale numerical simulation will be developed and conducted to realize the conjugated problem inside reaction layer of PEFC.

Takuya Masuda

Takuya Masuda
National Institute for Materials Science
Senior Researcher

Investigation of the oxygen reduction reaction mechanism by in situ solid/liquid interface XPS

Takuya Masuda_Fig A novel X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) system which enables to perform a measurement at solid/liquid interface under electrochemical condition is developed and utilized to investigate the oxygen reduction reaction mechanism at cathode electrodes for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells and Li-air batteries. Based on understanding of the reaction mechanism, sophisticated cathode electrodes with high electrocatalytic activity are designed.

Satoshi Nihonyanagi

Satoshi Nihonyanagi
RIKEN
ASI Research Scientist

Development of an extreme nonlinear spectromicroscope for buried material interfaces

Satoshi Nihonyanagi_Fig This project is dedicated to developing a novel nonlinear spectromicroscope, which would enable us to observe buried interfaces of real devices. Molecular structures and the spatial distributions of various material interfaces such as lithium ion battery will be revealed by applying this new method. Such molecular level elucidations of the material interfaces would promote designing or developing new devices/materials.

Naoya Shibata

Naoya Shibata
The University of Tokyo
Associate Professor

Development of atomic-resolution electromagnetic field imaging electron microscopy for interface analysis

Naoya Shibata_Fig Heterointerfaces are key component to develop high-efficiency, better property materials and devices for environmental and energy usages. To control interface properties, it is essential to understand their atomic structures and resultant local potential structures with associating electromagnetic fields. The main objective of this project is to develop a new electron microscopy technique for characterizing atomic-scale structures and resultant electromagnetic fields based on aberration-corrected electron microscopy. This new method will be applied to understand the origin of interface properties in energy materials and devices.

Kunio Takayanagi

Kunio Takayanagi
Tokyo Institute of Technology
Professor

Nanocycle at Nano-in-Macro Interface

Kunio Takayanagi_Fig Contacts of nano and macro structures, "nano-in-macro", can form specific phases which should govern cyclic transport of ions and electrons moving into and out from the contact phase, "nanocycle". The nanocycle at nano-in-macro is the key issue to be unveiled in order to make devices of a higher efficiency, i.e., lithium ion batteries and catalysts. Nano-in-macro structures and nanocycles are studied by the 50pm electron microscopy of the world best resolution.

Shigenao Maruyama

Shigenao Maruyama
Tohoku University
Professor

Breakthrough on multi-scale interfacial transport phenomena in oceanic methane hydrate reservior and application to large-scale methane production

Shigenao Maruyama_Fig To contribute the enhancement of large-scale methane production, we aim to clarify the mechanism of producing the methane gas from the oceanic methane hydrate (MH) reservoir. In this study, the micro-scale interfacial phenomena among solid, liquid, gas phase in MH reservoir will be observed and evaluated. Additionally, it will be connected to the macro-scale transport phenomena and the modeling of chemical reaction. Furthermore, it will be applied to the production of the methane gas from high pressure MH reservoir in mega-scale. It will contribute the green innovation as a new field in the interfacial technology.

Yuichiro Nagatsu

Yuichiro Nagatsu
Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology
Associate Professor

Creation of oil-water reactive rheological interface for dramatic enhanced oil recovery

Yuichiro Nagatsu_Fig Nowadays, Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR), to recover more oil from existing oil reservoirs, is an important issue. A decrease in oil recovery is caused by interfacial phenomena between oil in the reservoir and fluid injected to the reservoir to displace the oil. In the present study, we try to create oil-water reactive rheological interface which enables dramatic EOR by using changes in interfacial tension and interfacial rheology induced by chemical reaction at immiscible interface between the oil and the injected aqueous solution.

Jun Kano

Jun Kano
Okayama University
Associate Professor

Designed catalysis assisted by metal-ferroelectric interfaces

Jun Kano_Fig Development of designed novel catalysis assisted by ferroelectric polarization fluctuation is proposed. Charge fluctuation of ferroelectric materials appeared in the paraelectric phase can assist electron injection into the chemical reaction, realizing the catalytic function. The project aims to provide the method of designed ubiquitous catalyst using nanometal-ferroelectric junctions.

Kohei Ito

Kohei Ito
Kyushu Univeristy
Professor

Experimental exploration of critical mass transport at triple phase boundary in high-pressure water electrolysis

Kohei Ito_Fig High-pressure water electrolysis has the potential to directly and efficiently produce high-pressure hydrogen gas from water at normal pressure. However, some amount of hydrogen gas produced at cathode permeates to anode because of the large pressure difference between them, and this permeation reduces the efficiency. This study challenges to decrease the permeation. Incorporable countermeasures from the system engineering point of view, namely convection, wettability and buoyancy effect will be here evaluated and optimized, leading to extreme enhancement of the departure of hydrogen gas from the triple phase boundary, and leading to the critical performance of high-pressure water electrolyzer.

Koshi Adachi

Koshi Adachi
Tohoku University
Professor

Creation of Nanointerface Controlled by Tribochemical Reaction for Mechanical Systems with Super-low Friction

Koshi Adachi_Fig We aim for dramatic reduction in friction which accounts for a significant portion of energy losses in mechanical systems. Theoretical design of low friction system has been recognized as too difficult because friction is complex phenomenon that is affected by numerous factors such as material properties and experimental conditions.  In this project, we focus on “nanointerface” which is self-formed by friction-induced chemical reaction so called “tribo-chemical reaction”, and we clarify and control it from the viewpoints of material science, chemistry, physics as well as mechanical engineering. Based on such scientific and engineering understanding, we pursue creation of “nanointerface” which realizes super-low friction.

Tomoko Hirayama

Tomoko Hirayama
Doshisha University
Professor

Understanding of Mechanism for Ultra-Low Sliding Friction and Development of Novel Phase Interfaces

Tomoko Hirayama_Fig Tribological problems relating to occurrences of friction and wear in sliding surfaces are necessary to be solved as an important issue in the field of mechanical engineering. This study will show the best structures of phase interfaces and the mechanisms for ultra-low sliding friction through the in-situ observation using several kinds of unique analyzers such as a neutron reflectometer and an infrared spectrometer equipped with tribometers. In addition, the study will bring a guideline for the optimum design of phase interfaces and finally develop the novel interfaces achieving ultra-low friction.

Strategic Object

“To realize breakthroughs in phase-interface phenomena and create basic technologies for high-functionality interface that will result in dramatic advancements in highly-efficient energy utilization” (Set in FY2011)

Strategic Object

Research Object

CREST Type: Phase Interface Science for Highly Efficient Energy Utilization
PRESTO Type: Phase Interfaces for Highly Efficient Energy Utilization

Research Supervisor / Assistant Supervisor

Katsunori Hanamura          Nobuhide Kasagi          Kazuhito Hashimoto
Katsunori Hanamura
Professor
Tokyo Institute of Technology
CREST & PRESTO Supervisor
   Nobuhide Kasagi
Professor Emeritus
The University of Tokyo
ex- CREST & PRESTO
Supervisor
   Kazuhito Hashimoto
Professor
The University of Tokyo
ex- CREST & PRESTO
Assistant Supervisor

Outline of Research Object

The primary goal of this research area is to greatly advance fundamental science and technology, which include exploration of phase-interfacial energy conversion/transport phenomena and creation of high-performance phase interfaces, in order to achieve ever more efficient energy utilization and thus to realize an enriched sustainable society.

Specifically, we take up the challenge of creating phase interfaces with significantly reduced energy losses and/or those for highly efficient energy use by deepening fundamental theory and control/optimization methodology of phase interface phenomena. To accomplish these goals, it is indispensable to establish analytical and design techniques integrating nano-, meso- and macro-scales, as well as theoretical methods for the control and optimization of phase interface structures.

Furthermore, it is important that the results of such cutting edge fundamental research should be transferred and effectively applied to the design of real equipment and systems, leading to dramatically improved performance, reduced carbon emissions and lower costs.

The ultimate goal of this research area, therefore, is to elucidate energy conversion and transport mechanisms at phase interfaces in order to enable highly efficient energy use; to develop measurement, modeling and simulation methods for integrative analysis and design of phase interface phenomena at multiple scales; to establish mathematical methods for the control and optimization of phase interface structures; and to realize highly functional phase interfaces that allow for theoretically possible maximal performance in actual devices and equipment. To meet these goals, we encourage integrated challenges that go beyond the bounds of existing scientific disciplines and combine the knowledge gained in different fields.

link

Pamphlet

CREST

PRESTO

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