[Nanomechanics] Year Started : 2019

Hideyuki Ootsuka

Mechano-multifunctional Polymeric Materials Based on Dynamic Covalent Chemistry

Research Director
Hideyuki Ootsuka

Professor
School of Materials and Chemical Technology
Tokyo Institute of Technology

Collaborator
Hiroshi Ito Professor
​Graduate School of Organic Materials Science
Yamagata University
Koichiro Mikami Chief Engineer
Engineering Division
Panasonic Industry Co., Ltd.
Outline

Functional materials triggered by macroscopic mechanical stimulation such as compression, stretching, shearing, bending, impact, and friction are called “mechanofunctional materials”. In this project, innovative mechano-multifunctional polymeric materials, which show more than one mechano-functionality will be prepared. The materials design will be based on “dynamic covalent chemistry” which utilizes the covalent bonds under equilibrium. Furthermore, mechanism of the multi-mechanofunctional materials will be clarified by multi-scale dynamic analyses to obtain insight into a guiding principle of the materials design.

Takamasa Sakai

Elucidation of robust-toughening mechanism of gels and development of artificial tendon and ligament

Research Director
Takamasa Sakai

Professor
Graduate School of Engineering
The University of Tokyo

Collaborator
Kotaro Satoh Professor
School of Materials and Chemical Technology
Tokyo Institute of Technology
Yuichi Masubuchi Professor
Graduate School of Engineering
Nagoya University
Koichi Mayumi Associate Professor
The Institute for Solid State Physics
The University of Tokyo
Outline

For a practical application of hydrogels to artificial tendons and ligaments, we develop innovative biocompatible hydrogels that constantly exhibit an excellent mechanical response (mechanical robustness) even in harsh environments with repeating mechanical stress. To achieve mechanical robustness, we will introduce a novel toughening mechanism, i.e. control over dynamic and static crystallizations. Throughout synthesis, experiment, and simulation, we will elucidate the robust-toughening mechanism based on dynamic and static crystallization. Finally, we will develop prototypes of artificial tendon and ligament, and examine the functionality through the animal experiments.

Hiroshi Jinnai

Elucidation of adhesion/fracture mechanism of soft/hard interface by atomic resolution electron microscopy

Research Director
Hiroshi Jinnai

Professor
Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials
Tohoku University

Collaborator
Kazutomo Suenaga Professor
Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research
Osaka University
Teruyasu Mizoguchi Professor
Institute of Industrial Science
The University of Tokyo
Kaname Yoshida Researcher
Nanostructures Research Laboratory
Japan Fine Ceramics Center
Outline

Combining organic and inorganic materials is an effective method for realizing lightweight and high-strength materials. Such a composite material has an interface (called a heterogeneous interface) where different materials come into contact, and plays an important role in the function of the material. In this study, we used the most advanced electron microscopy and theoretical calculations to precisely identify the arrangement of atoms and molecules at the interface. Furthermore, we will clarify the fundamental principle of adhesion/fracture mechanism at the heterogeneous interface by applying the above atomic scale knowledge to the macroscopic delamination phenomena, called the anchor effect.

Nobuhiro Tsuji

Advanced structural metals showing both high strength and large ductility by controling nucleation of different deformation modes

Research Director
Nobuhiro Tsuji

Professor
Graduate School of Engineering
Kyoto University

Collaborator
Kazuyuki Shizawa Professor
Faculty of Science and Technology
Keio University
Tomotsugu Simokawa Professor
Institute of Science and Engineering
Kanazawa University
Mitsuhiro Murayama Professor
Institute for Materials Chemistry and Engineering
Kyushu University
Outline

We firstly clarify the mechanism for the nucleation of various deformation modes from grain boundaries and interfaces in the metallic materials having highly controlled nano-/micro-structures. Then, the mechanism for the regeneration of strain-hardening ability by the nucleation of different deformation modes is fundamentally studied. Based on the obtained results, we try to realize advanced structural metals having both high strength and large ductility, through designing and processing the nano-/micro-structures of materials in which different deformation modes can be sequentially activated. Using state-of-the-art methods in both experiments and calculations, deformation mechanism in nano—scales is correlated with macroscopic deformation behaviors.

Hiroyuki Toda

Tomography for bridging nano and macro: semi-spontaneous interfacial debonding

Research Director
Hiroyuki Toda

Professor
Graduate School of Engineering
Kyushu University

Collaborator
Taisuke Sasaki Principal researcher
Research Center for Magnetic and Spingronic Materials
National Institute for Materials Science
Shigeru Hamada Professor
Graduate School of Engineering
Kyushu University
Kyosuke Hirayama Assistant Professor
Deaparyment of Materials Science and Engineering
Kyoto University
Kenji Matsuda Professor
Academic Assembly
University of Toyama
masatake Yamaguchi Research Director
Center for Computational Science & e-Systems
Japan Atomic Energy Agency
Outline

In this project, we revisit the ductile fracture via interfacial debonding of particles by employing the advanced micro- and nano-tomography techniques for bridging nano and macro, and also by combining it with the nanoscopic image-based computational physics and the macroscopic mechanical-engineering approach. We will thereby elucidate the debonding mechanism of incoherent interface and also physically clarify its dominant factors. We will provide academic approaches to bridge nano and macro by utilizing the fact that nanoscopic dislocations are identical to macroscopic strain.

Hidehiro Yoshida

Strong field nanodynamics at grain boundaries and interfaces in ceramics

Research Director
Hidehiro Yoshida

Professor
Graduate School of Engineering
The University of Tokyo

Collaborator
Koji Morita Chief Researcher
Research Center for Functional Materials
National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS)
Takahisa Yamamoto Professor
Graduate School of Engineering
Nagoya University
Outline

Ceramic materials under strong electric fields have been found to exhibit unique mechanical responses such as low-temperature and high-speed superplastic deformation. Behind these phenomena, a new physics termed strong field nanodynamics is hidden; that is, an excitation of kinetics in the nanoscale regions such as grain boundaries and interfaces. In this research project, we will build a discipline of strong electric field nanodynamics and aim to obtain theoretical guidelines for development of new macromechanical responses such as large ductility and strong-field healing in ceramics.

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