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Environment and Energy (Global‐scale environmental issues)

Development of the Atmospheric Environmental Risk Management System in South America Filling in a Blank in the Observation Network to Capture Atmospheric Environment Changes

Principal Investigator (Affiliation)
  • SDGs11
  • SDGs3
  • SDGs17
Prof.
MIZUNO Akira
(Institute for Space-Earth Environmental Research, Nagoya University)
Research Institutions in Japan Nagoya University / National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES)
Research Institutions in Argentina and Chile Laser and Applications Research Center (CEILAP) / The University of Magallanes (UMAG)
Adoption fiscal year FY 2012
Research Period 5 Years
ODA Recipient Country Argentina Argentina(image) Chile Chile(image)
General Description of the Research Project

Building ground-based system to measure atmospheric changes and to deliver the information in real time
In South America, important environmental challenges include aerosols* from volcanic ash, forest fires, and mineral extraction, and also intense exposure to ultraviolet radiation due to the ozone hole. Despite these circumstances, the deployment of ground-based observation systems has been slow, and South America still remains a blank area in worldwide observation networks. This project aims to put in place observation networks that use state-of-the-art remote sensing technology and to construct real-time data management systems that can rapidly deliver the information of atmospheric environmental risk. The aim is to find ways to reduce the impact of threats to public health, interruption of airline schedules, and other problems for society.
* Aerosol: Microscopic particles of fluid or solid suspended in the air. Volcanic ash aerosols in particular are a threat to air traffic.

Global changes in the atmosphere can be seen from South American observation data
The observation data forms a precious database that contributes to elucidating atmospheric changes on a global scale, and is being used in models to predict both long- and short-term changes. The outcome of this project should provide a template for policies to counter environmental risk through multilateral collaboration between South American countries. It is also hoped that new viewpoints gained from comparative studies will enhance understanding and benefit studies of Asian dust (or yellow sand), which is an issue in East Asia.

Photo gallery
Local researcher (graduate student) adjusts an ozone observation system incorporating high-sensitivity superconductor millimeter-wave sensors

Local researcher (graduate student) adjusts an ozone observation system incorporating high-sensitivity superconductor millimeter-wave sensors

The Southern Patagonia observatory at Rio Gallegos, one of the sites in the observation network constructed for this research. The container at front right contains the millimeter-wave ozone observation system, and the container at the left contains an ozone observation system using lidar (laser radar).

The Southern Patagonia observatory at Rio Gallegos, one of the sites in the observation network constructed for this research. The container at front right contains the millimeter-wave ozone observation system, and the container at the left contains an ozone observation system using lidar (laser radar).

Local researcher explaining the Solmaforo UV meter, which measures ultraviolet radiation and communicates UV intensity to the public in trafficlight style.

Local researcher explaining the Solmaforo UV meter, which measures ultraviolet radiation and communicates UV intensity to the public in trafficlight style.

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