R&D Projects

Study of Innovation Strategies Conducive to Creating Future Industries

Project Director

プログラムアドバイザー:山口 栄一
Eiichi YAMAGUCHI
Professor, Graduate School of Advanced Integrated Studies in Human Survivability,
Kyoto University

Objective

  • We will develop an “intelligence map” of Japan to provide a new platform for making policy, designing systems, and implementing them into society.
  • We will use a navigation service to calculate the traveling distance and time between collaborators. After that, the conditions for successful innovation will be clarified from the perspective of distance and time between collaborators.
  • We will research the universality and distinctiveness when innovation interacts with science, and develop educational curriculum to nurture program directors and chief science officers for innovation-driven enterprises. As a final goal, we will set up a program for the certification of “Innovation Sommeliers” who are well-skilled in judging future industries.
  • Taking the biotech industry, which is an industry in which science and patents have a very deep connection, as an example, we will clearly show the institutional and customary problems of the Japanese innovation and industrial systems, and offer new policies to create future industries.

We will find out what kind of corporate organization will facilitate scientific and technological innovations, and review the way capital markets will be involved, and design a social system that facilitates the growth and development of entrepreneurs.

Outline

The purpose of this research project is to clarify what structures have caused delays in solving various issues in Japan’s industrial society, and to propose formulas for solving these issues. A major factor behind the delay in resolving these issues in Japanese society is thought to be that although there has been a shift in the supporters of innovation-driven industries from closed major corporation to integrated open networks of innovators, grasping that this shift was taking place was ignored.

First, we will develop an “intelligence map of Japan” by incorporating the opinions of users. This map will create a visualization of the organic connections between science, technology, people, organizations, and institutions. This map will be made available to related cooperating organizations as an innovative-emergent tool for analysis and evaluation.

Second, we will develop educational curriculum to nurture professionals who are well-skilled in judging what can connect science and innovation, and establish a program to certify “Innovation Sommeliers.”

Third, taking biotech industry as a typical example, we will clearly show the institutional and customary problems of the Japanese innovation and industrial systems, and offer new policies to create future industries.

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