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Environment/Energy (Low carbon society/energy)

Principal Investigator (Affiliation)
  • SDGs13
  • SDGs12
Prof.
IMOU Kenji
(Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, The University of Tokyo)
Research Institutions in Japan The University of Tokyo / Kanazawa Institute of Technology (K.I.T.) / Kurume University
Research Institutions in Mozambique Eduardo Mondlane University (UEM), etc.
Adoption fiscal year FY 2010
Research Period 5 Years
ODA Recipient Country Republic of Mozambique
General Description of the Research Project

Enriching the people and forests of Mozambique through biodiesel fuel production
In this project, biodiesel fuel plants will be cultivated in the arid regions in southern Mozambique that are not suitable for crop cultivation, in an effort to reduce CO2 emissions, improve the lives of local residents through the creation of industry and so on. At the same time, the solid fuels that are produced as a byproduct will be made available for use in place of the firewood and charcoal that are currently major sources of fuel in Mozambique, thereby reducing tree cutting and preventing deforestation. This is an effort to build a sustainable production system by ensuring both economic viability and a positive environmental impact.

Helping to improve the environment through the cultivation of Jatropha
The project is studying the breeding of varieties of Jatropha, a biodiesel fuel suitable for cultivation in arid regions, as well as cultivation methods that are low-risk with regard to climate change. Technologies for inspecting the quality and safety of the manufactured fuel are also being developed. The project is being conducted with a view to future industrialization of fuel production and deploying the approach to other countries in Africa.

Photo gallery
Jatropha seeds hold great promise as biofuel

Jatropha seeds hold great promise as biofuel

When trees are cut down to produce firewood and charcoal, the land is left devastated. Similar practices are a serious problem in various parts of Africa.

When trees are cut down to produce firewood and charcoal, the land is left devastated. Similar practices are a serious problem in various parts of Africa.

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