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ADACHI Molecular Exciton Engineering Project

▼Click each molecule for an explanation!

 

Singlet Fission
One exciton can split into two through the process of fission. Doubling the number of excitons could double the output current of solar cells and improve efficiency. New materials and a deeper understanding of the process are needed to fully utilize fission.

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Lasing
One exciton can trigger other excitons to emit light with the exact same properties. This process is the basis for creating organic lasers that could make lasers widely available. Many challenges still remain to meet the stringent requirements for lasing.

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Light Emission
A molecule can gain extra energy in the form of an exciton when a positive (electron) and negative (hole) charge meet. The exciton can release this energy by emitting light. This emission can be used for displays, lighting, sensors, and more.

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Power Generation
Excitons can also be created by absorbing energy from light. By then separating the positive and negative charges in the exciton, electricity can be generated. Organic materials are a path to flexible, lightweight, and low-cost solar cells.

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Circularly-Polarized Luminescence
Through appropriate molecular design, light with a rotating electric field, called circularly polarized, can be emitted. This kind of emission can be useful for new types of displays, optical storage systems, sensors, and more.

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Long Lifetime
By suppressing the processes that destroy excitons, energy can be stored in excitons for longer periods of time before being released. These processes of storage and delayed release are under investigation for new applications.

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We are hard at work studying relationships between molecular structure and physical properties, creating new materials, and developing new device structures to exploit excitons and establish the next generation of electronics based on organic materials.

 
 

What is an exciton?

An exciton is an energetic state in semiconductors that can be thought of as a bound negative (electron) and positive (hole) charge. Excitons directly affect the electrical and optical properties and behavior of devices and films that use organic materials as semiconductors. The engineering and controlling of processes related to excitons is key to fully unlocking the potential of organic semiconductors and optoelectronics. With the possibility for flexible, lightweight, and low-cost devices and uses ranging from displays and lasers to power generation and transistors, the next generation of organic electronics will play a growing role in everyday life.

 

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Members

Chihaya Adachi

Chihaya Adachi

Research Director

[Research interests]
Organic optoelectronics, organic semiconductor device
properties, organic photo-
physics and photochemistry

Hajime Nakanotani

Hajime Nakanotani

Project Coordinator

[Research interests]
Organic single-crystal-based
devices, OLEDs, OTFTs

Ryota  Kabe

Ryota Kabe
(Assistant Professor)

Molecular Design and Synthesis Group Leader

[Research interests]
Organic semicon-
ductors, supra-
molecules, metal
complexes, photo-
chemistry

Toshinori Matsushima

Toshinori Matsushima
(Associate Professor)

Device-Oriented Breakthrough Group Leader

[Research interests]
Organic lasers, OLEDs, organic-inorganic hybrid devices

Kenichi Goushi

Kenichi Goushi
(Assistant Professor)

Unique Physical Processes Group Leader

[Research interests]
Organic opto-
electronics, photo-
physics, device physics

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News and Events

2017.07.28
Our eleventh project-wide research meeting will be on Friday, September 29.
2017.07.28
Our recent TADF results were published in the journal ACS Central Science.
2017.07.28
We attended the International Symposium on Organic and Polymeric Optoelectronics in Changchun, China, from June 28 to 30.
2017.07.28
Our new laser results were published in the journal Science Advances.
2017.07.28
Our tenth project-wide research meeting was held on Friday, June 9.
2017.02.28
Our ninth project-wide research meeting will be on Friday, March 3.
2017.02.28
We attended nano tech 2017, February 15-17 2017.
2017.02.28
We hosted the international symposium "Frontiers of Organic Semiconductor Lasers 2017" on January 20.
2016.10.13
Our eighth project-wide research meeting will be on Friday, November 25.
2016.10.13
We attended New Scientist Live in London, September 22-25, 2016.
2016.09.29
We will be hosting the international symposium ”Frontiers of Organic Semiconductor Lasers 2017” on January 20, 2017.
2016.09.29
We attended JST Fair 2016, August 25-26 2016.
2016.07.07
Professor Adachi has been selected as a recipient of a 4th Thomson Reuters Research Front Award.
2016.06.22
Our seventh project-wide research meeting will be on Friday, August 3.
2016.04.25-26
We attended the International Conference“Nanoscience and Nanotechnology”, which took place in Sri Lanka.
2016.02.27
Our results were published in the journal Science Advances.
2016.02.18
Our sixth project-wide research meeting will be on Friday, March 4.
2016.02.18
International Conference “Nanoscience and Nanotechnology” co-sponsored by the JST-ERATO ADACHI Molecular Exciton Engineering Project, will take place on April 26-27 2016 in Sri Lanka.
2016.02.18
OPACK's booth, at which we exhibited our ERATO project and results, took home the Academic-Industrial Alliance Award at nano tech 2016 held from 1/27 to 29.
2015.10.20
Kyoto University and Kyushu University have issued a joint press release on their recent results.
2015.09.25
Our fifth project-wide research meeting will be on Friday, November 27.
2015.07.15
As part of MOC'15, a special session on organic lasers will take place on October 26, 2015, organized in part by Prof. Adachi and co-sponsored by the JST-ERATO ADACHI Molecular Exciton Engineering Project.
2015.07.15
Our fourth project-wide research meeting will be on Friday, July 17.
2015.03.19
Our headquarters have moved to room #224 of the new Co-Evolutional Social Systems Building. The access page has been updated to reflect our new location.
2015.03.03
The AIP News Staff highlighted our recent work toward realizing electrically-driven organic lasers!
2015.01.16
Prof. Hajime Nakanotani has been chosen as our new Project Coordinator!
2014.12.09
Our third project-wide research meeting will be on Friday, March 6.
2014.10.06
Our second project-wide research meeting will be on Friday, November 21.
2014.10.06
The homepage for the ADACHI Molecular Exciton Engineering Project is now open!
 
 
 

Project Overview

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To further the fundamental understanding of excitons and fully harness them, the ADACHI Molecular Exciton Engineering Project was founded under the Exploratory Research for Advanced Technology (ERATO) program of the Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST) in 2013 and will run until March 2019. This project is exploring novel molecular excitonic processes in organic thin films and pioneering their related basic photophysics, device physics, and materials science. We aim to engineer and control undeveloped excitonic processes and design novel materials and optoelectronic devices with new functionalities. Through this, we will create both high-performance devices and new, innovative devices that will unlock additional applications, with one major goal of achieving organic semiconductor lasers. These advances are expected to contribute to organic electronics helping to shape the future of society.

 

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施設

Facilities and equipment

The facilities at OPERA house a wide variety of equipment for the creation and characterization of new materials, films, and devices including fully-equipped synthesis labs for over 30 people, NMR, TG-DTA, multiple vacuum train sublimation systems, over nine vacuum deposition systems connected to gloveboxes, an e-beam lithography system, optical labs, an XRD system, UV-Vis-NIR spectrophotometer, photoluminescence spectrometer, PLQY measurement system, streak camera, and OLED, OPV, and OTFT measurement systems.

Headquarters and collaborators

The ADACHI Molecular Exciton Engineering Project is based at the Center for Organic Photonics and Electronics Research (OPERA) at Kyushu University, Ito Campus, in Fukuoka, Japan. The center was established in 2010 to create new advances in organic electronics and will continue that goal through this project. Collaborative investigators include research groups from other departments at Kyushu University and groups at other universities including Kyoto University and Waseda University.

 
 
 
 

Message from the Research Director

The endless possibilities for the molecular design of organic com- pounds makes the realization of a wide variety of new functions and applications achievable. The potential for developments in optoelectronics is particularly high. Through our ERATO project, we aim to clarify undeveloped excitonic processes, primarily in organic thin-films, and create new devices such as organic semiconductor lasers. By exploiting such processes in this project, we believe new molecules that overturn traditional thinking will be produced. To accomplish this, we will strive to forge a fresh research environment conducive to multidisciplinary research and truly creative thinking by establishing a team of international researchers on the leading edge and forming collaborations with researchers from a broad range of backgrounds.

 

 

 
 

Research Groups

Molecular design and synthesis

Explaining how chemical structures affect material properties and creating appropriate molecules is paramount to understanding the nature of excitons and completely utilizing them. This group aims to clarify the relationships between structure and function and to develop new molecules for light emis- sion, singlet fission, exciton storage, and oriented growth by attacking molecular design from both quantum chemical and empirical fronts and feeding the properties of obtained molecules back into the design process.

Device-oriented breakthrough

Excitonic processes can be controlled not only by material choice but also by developing new device structures. This group will explore new types of OLEDs, solar cells, transistors, thermoelectric generators, and other devices with solid-state films, liquid-state semiconductors, and single crystals to effectively control and harness excitonic processes. Our ultimate goal is to realize solid-state organic lasers and environmentally-friendly bio-electronics devices.

Unique physical processes

The unique physical processes of excitons and ways to control them are still not fully understood. This group’s focuses include exploring the physics of exciton dynamics, studying in detail how deposition processes can affect molecular orientation and thereby exciton dynamics, and exploiting energy transfer processes to develop new devices.

 
 
 

Access ・ Contact

 

Kyushu University
Center for Organic Photonics and Electronics Research
Co-Evolutional Social Systems Building, 744 Motooka, Nishi, Fukuoka, 819-0395, Japan
TEL:092-802-6920 FAX:092-802-6921

 

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